Feds gave native supremacist magazine $1.2M

The use of fire, masks, justification of violence in defence of land and cultural/racial purity; and vilification of victims are common to both white supremacists and native extremists. This visual commentary on the striking similarities of the two groups was produced by a Caledonia resident in 2006 using actual photos from the lawlessness that took place there by native protesters. The masked native (KKK hood added) has been superimposed in front of the Stirling Street bridge which was allowed to burn to the ground because the Ontario Provincial Police refused to protect firefighters from natives who threatened to kill them if they tried to save it.

The use of fire, masks, justification of violence in defence of land and cultural/racial purity; and vilification of victims are common to both white supremacists and native extremists. This visual commentary on the striking similarities of the two groups was produced by a Caledonia resident in 2006 using actual photos from the lawlessness that took place there by native protesters. The masked native (KKK hood added) has been superimposed in front of the Stirling Street bridge which was allowed to burn to the ground because the Ontario Provincial Police refused to protect firefighters from natives who threatened to kill them if they tried to save it.

The Caledonia Victims Project and VoiceofCanada have received confirmation from the federal Department of Canadian Heritage that it provided a total of $1,052,653 in funding to RedWire Magazine, and continues to fund it despite knowing that its October 2007 Defending the Land edition  contained a ‘how-to’ guide entitled ‘War Against the Machines’ to instruct would-be terrorists on how to block roads, attack snowmobilers, cause floods, use Molotov cocktails and destroy bridges, machinery and hydro lines.

Redwire also received funding from the Canada Council for the Arts.

Read the rest of this story here:

Advertisements

Comments are closed.